All About Achilles Tendonitis

Overview

Achilles TendonAchilles tendonitis is a condition wherein the Achilles tendon, at or near its insertion to back of the heel, becomes inflamed and causes pain. The Achilles tendon is one of the longest and strongest tendons in the body. It is avascular (not supplied with blood vessels) so it can be slow to heal. The Achilles tendon is formed in the lower third of the leg. Two muscles join to form the Achilles tendon, the Gastrocnemius and the Soleus which are commonly referred to as the calf muscle. The Achilles tendon works as an anti-pronator which means it helps to prevent the foot from rolling inward.


Causes

Tight or tired calf muscles, which transfer too much of the force associated with running onto the Achilles tendon. Not stretching the calves properly or a rapid increase in intensity and frequency of sport training can make calf muscles fatigued. Activities which place a lot of stress on the achilles tendon, such as hill running and sprint training, can also cause Achilles Tendinitis. Runners who overpronate (roll too far inward on their feet during impact) are most susceptible to Achilles Tendinitis. Runners with flat feet are susceptible to Achilles Tendinitis because flat feet cause a ‘wringing out’ effect on the achilles tendon during running. High arched feet usually absorb less shock from the impact of running so that shock is transferred to the Achilles tendon. Use of inappropriate footwear when playing sport or running e.g., sandals, can also put an extra load on the Achilles tendon. Shoes are now available that have been designed for individual sports and provide cushioning to absorb the shock of impact and support for the foot during forceful movements. Training on hard surfaces e.g., concrete, also increases the risk of Achilles Tendinitis. Landing heavily or continuously on a hard surface can send a shock through the body which is partly absorbed by the Achilles tendon. A soft surface like grass turf helps to lessen the shock of the impact by absorbing some of the force of the feet landing heavily on the ground after a jump or during a running motion.


Symptoms

Symptoms include pain in the heel and along the tendon when walking or running. The area may feel painful and stiff in the morning. The tendon may be painful to touch or move. The area may be swollen and warm. You may have trouble standing up on one toe.


Diagnosis

Laboratory studies usually are not necessary in evaluating and diagnosing an Achilles tendon rupture or injury, although evaluation may help to rule out some of the other possibilities in the differential diagnosis. Imaging studies. Plain radiography: Radiographs are more useful for ruling out other injuries than for ruling in Achilles tendon ruptures. Ultrasonography: Ultrasonography of the leg and thigh can help to evaluate the possibility of deep venous thrombosis and also can be used to rule out a Baker cyst; in experienced hands, ultrasonography can identify a ruptured Achilles tendon or the signs of tendinosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): MRI can facilitate definitive diagnosis of a disrupted tendon and can be used to distinguish between paratenonitis, tendinosis, and bursitis.


Nonsurgical Treatment

NSAIDS like ibuprofen are often prescribed to help manage the pain and inflammation. Steroids are often recommended when patients do not respond to NSAID treatment. They are often most effective when injected directly into the inflamed and swollen area. Physiotherapy is a great way to stretch and strengthen the Achilles tendon. A good physical therapist will also teach the patient techniques which give better foot support during exercise (taping, wrapping, etc?). Orthotics, assistive devices and insoles can be used to cushion and cradle the arch of the foot during the healing process. Shock Wave Therapy. This is the newest form of treatment and uses concentrated sound waves to stimulate healing in the affected area. This form of treatment is reserved for heel pain that is unresponsive to other forms of treatment.

Achilles Tendonitis


Surgical Treatment

Following the MRI or ultrasound scan of the Achilles tendon the extent of the degenerative change would have been defined. The two main types of operation for Achilles tendinosis are either a stripping of the outer sheath (paratenon) and longitudinal incisions into the tendon (known as a debridement) or a major excision of large portions of the tendon, the defects thus created then being reconstructed using either allograft (donor tendon, such as Wright medical graft jacket) or more commonly using a flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer. In cases of Achilles tendonosis with more minor degrees of degenerative change the areas can be stimulated to repair itself by incising the tendon, in the line of the fibres, which stimulates an ingrowth of blood vessels and results in the healing response. With severe Achilles tendonosis, occasionally a large area of painful tendon needs to be excised which then produces a defect which requires filling. This is best done by transferring the flexor hallucis longus muscle belly and tendon, which lies adjacent to the Achilles tendon. This results in a composite/double tendon after the operation, with little deficit from the transferred tendon.


Prevention

Wear shoes that fit correctly and support your feet: Replace your running or exercise shoes before the padding or shock absorption wears out. Shock absorption greatly decreases as the treads on the bottoms or sides of your shoes begin to wear down. You may need running shoes that give your foot more heel or arch support. You may need shoe inserts to keep your foot from rolling inward. Stretch before you exercise: Always warm up your muscles and stretch gently before you exercise. Do cool down exercises when you are finished. This will loosen your muscles and decrease stress on your Achilles tendon. Exercise the right way: If your tendinitis is caused by the way that you exercise, ask a trainer, coach, or your caregiver for help. They can teach you ways to train or exercise to help prevent Achilles tendinitis. Do not run or exercise on uneven or hard surfaces. Instead, run on softer surfaces such as treadmills, rubber tracks, grass, or evenly packed dirt tracks.

Advertisements

Pictures, Remedies & Treatment

Elderly individuals (can be called geriatric) are susceptible to a number of foot specific conditions Some of these conditions can leave individuals disabled if they are not prevented and/or taken care of. Some of these common foot related conditions include: arthritis, ingrown toenails, fungal nails, diabetic ulcers, and corns/calluses. It is an interesting fact that if you were to go barefoot every day of your life, you would not suffer with feet corns.

Ingrown nails cause pressure and pain along the nail edges. The most common cause of ingrown toenails is pressure from shoes. Other causes of ingrown toenails include improperly trimmed nails, crowding of the toes, and repeated trauma to the feet from activities such as running, walking, or doing aerobics. Severe problems with ingrown nails may be corrected with surgery to remove part of the toenail and growth plate. Plantar warts — Plantar warts look like calluses on the ball of the foot or on the heel. Plantar warts are caused by a virus that infects the outer layer of skin on the soles of the feet. If you are not sure if you have a plantar wart or a callus, let your health care provider decide. Wash your feet in warm water every day, using a mild soap. Dry your feet well, especially between the toes. If you have poor blood flow, it is especially important to do a daily foot check.

Nationality can also influence foot structure: Many Mediterranean people, for instance, have particularly low arches, while many Northern Europeans tend to have high ones. One of your best precautions against foot pain is to be aware of both the hereditary factors (which you can’t change) and the lifestyle and life-stage factors (which you can change or, at least, influence) that determine whether your feet are healthy or hurting. This article offers easy and helpful suggestions for treating many of the more common foot conditions people experience. However, there are certain foot problems that are so serious, you should seek a doctor’s care immediately. Likewise, certain people should never attempt to self-treat a foot problem.

Go for those, which provide support, cushioning, and enough room for the toes to move. People with flexible flat feet have arches that disappear when they put weight on their feet, but which reappear when the feet are not weight-bearing, or when they go up on their toes. In fact, this reappearance of the arch while the foot is non-weight bearing is really what separates this type of flatfoot from other types. It’s as though the arches take toe-standing as a general call of olly-olly-oxen-free: time to come out and tease the seeker about how great your hiding place was. Visit Cure Athlete’s Foot In 7 Days.

Some common causes of toe pain are arthritis, broken bones, eryhromelagia, gout, ingrown toe nails, joint injuries, raynaud’s phenomenon, scelderma, toe sprain, and bunions.

Even when you are experiencing ankle, knee, leg or back pain podiatry Windsor can often help. Podiatry Windsor is really no different than a dentist; we should all get regular checkups, even when nothing seems wrong, to ensure we take care of the health of our feet. However some of the important reasons to get a consultation with a Podiatrist are; persistent foot or ankle pain that won’t go away with rest, ice or anti-inflammatories, a wound or sore that does not heal, foot discolorations (if one foot is a much different color than the other), any pain or swelling, and numbness, burning or tingling in the feet. An important thing to point out is that podiatry Windsor is a very good preventative practice. Below is Dr Foot’s 20 foot care tips.

Using Listerine for severe foot conditions can be wrong for example, for example, if you have cuts and wounds in case of toenail fungus, cracked heels, warts, corns and calluses, you must go for taking medical assistance to get relief from this painful and severe condition of feet. But some says feet skin gets green spots on feet while using cool mint Listerine. So it can be used confidently as it is reliable home remedy to treat feet problems. Plain cornstarch makes a great foot dusting powder.Plantar Fasciitis,Pes Planus,Mallet Toe,High Arched Feet,Heel Spur,Heel Pain,Hammer Toe,Hallux Valgus,Foot Pain,Foot Hard Skin,Foot Conditions,Foot Callous,Flat Feet,Fallen Arches,Diabetic Foot,Contracted Toe,Claw Toe,Bunions Hard Skin,Bunions Callous,Bunion Pain,Ball Of Foot Pain,Back Pain